WRHSRC Publications: Research Briefs

In 2003, the Center began publishing Research Briefs -- short summaries of research projects, written for cleanup practicioners and others interested in emerging cleanup technologies. Click on the links below to read the briefs.

  • Brief #1. -- Field tools to measure redox potential in aquifers. (Profile of research by Dr. James Ingle, Oregon State University.)

  • Brief #2. -- Palladium catalysts as a tool to clean up halogenated volatile organic compounds in groundwater (Profile of research by Dr. Martin Reinhard, Stanford University.)

  • Brief #3. -- A field study on cometabolism – a process where microbes trigger the degradation of contaminants. (Profile of research by Drs. Semprini and Dolan of Oregon State University and Dr. Perry McCarty of Stanford University.)

  • Brief #4 -- Defining the kinetics and inhibition of anaerobic reductive dechlorination of PCE and TCE. (Profile of research by Dr. Semprini of Oregon State University.)

  • Brief #5 -- Developing "Push-pull" tests for monitoring bioaugmention with reductive dechlorinating cultures. (Profile of research by Drs. Istok, Field, and Dolan of Oregon State University.)

  • Brief #6 -- Strategies for cost-effective chemical delivery and mixing for bioremediation. (Profile of research by Dr. Kitanidis and his research team at Stanford University.)

  • Brief #7 -- Soil and mineral nanopores and their role in contaminant fate and transport. (Profile of research by Dr. Reinhard and his research team at Stanford University.)

  • Brief #8 -- Bioremediation by aerobic cometabolism with butane-grown microorganisms. (Profile of research by Drs. Arp and Bottomley and their research team at Oregon State University.)

  • Brief #9 -- A novel approach for determining transverse dispersion, a process that facilitates dilution and mixing of contaminants in groundwater. (Profile of research by Dr. Kitanidis and his research team at Stanford University.)

  • Brief #10 -- Studies to apply polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for monitoring bioremediation in situ. (Profile of research by Dr. Spoorman and Dr. Behrens at Stanford University.)